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Risk of Rotavirus

Transmission of rotavirus occurs through direct contact with infected faeces, for example, if a foal eats or even licks infected droppings.2

Once a foal has been infected, it can shed the virus for up to 10 days2, and the virus then survive up to 9 months in the environment3

Minimising risk

There are steps you can take to minimise the risk of problems caused by rotavirus infection:

  • Vaccinate your breeding mares.2,4
  • Keep infected foals away from other young horses.4
  • Strict hygiene is vital – disinfect the affected stall, equipment and any clothing that has come into contact with the sick foal.4
  • Wear protective clothing when you come into contact with an affected horse, and either discard it afterwards or leave it in the affected stall.4 

 

Rotavirus_CTA


References:

  1. Australian Government Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation. Rotavirus and equine diarrhoea. Equine Research News, July 2013.
  2. Netvet.co.uk. Equine rotavirus in horses. Available online: www.netvet.co.uk. Accessed 27/8/13
  3. Bailey et al, Equine Rotaviruses – Current Understanding and Continuing Challenges, Veterinary Microbiology (2013)
  4. Dwyer RM. Control and prevention of foal diarrhea outbreaks. Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the AAEP 2001; Vol 47: 472–5.